Random Recipe

Featured

Categories

Pama Frost

Happy New Year!

Over the years we have done plenty of experiments with ingredients, often recommending to our readers that it's okay to adopt a playful attitude of trial and error when it comes to recipes. Sometimes it's a result of substitutions for not having the right ingredients, but more often it comes down to personal taste. There are recipes that call for very specific proportions, but most of the time it makes more sense to taste the result and adjust as necessary. For instance, adjustments are almost always expected when balancing sweet and sour. One never knows how much acid is present in a volume of citrus juice, and personal taste can affect what you consider "balanced". We tend to lean toward the sour side, but we understand that some recipes are meant to be sweet. Time and experience can transform your idea of a good cocktail.

Today, we

Click here and take a bigger gulp of this article. . .

Halloween Party Cocktails

It's a question we get asked every year: What cocktail should I feature at my Halloween party? There are a lot different answers depending on what is important for your situation. We usually answer with a series of questions. How much work do you want to do ahead of time? How much work do you want to do during the party? Do you want to make something spirit-driven or citrus-based? How important is it for your theme to be represented (either in name or ingredients)? Your answers to these questions can be determining factors, so here's a list of possibilities with summaries and links to the specific details.

Batches and Bowls We usually always refer folks to large-volume solutions like Punch, Sangria, and Morganthaler's Gallon of Margaritas. We covered all of these in this post back in January. Even if none of them are for you, it's a good

Click here and take a bigger gulp of this article. . .

Portland Bar Review: Imperial

What can we say but the facts. This is a great downtown spot on SW Broadway that always has delicious food and a terrific cocktail menu. Being one of chef Vitaly Paley's restaurants, it's arguably one of the top places to eat in Portland. With cocktails created by former barman and local mixology hero, Brandon Wise, it's hard to go wrong at Imperial. Come for happy hour and sit at the bar where you might stare right past (or through) gigantic blocks of crystal clear ice. Imperial does craft cocktails properly, serving unusual combinations and house mixers (radish gastrique is amazing!). They even have a couple of cocktails on tap along with wine, beer, cider and even some carefully constructed non-alcoholic selections.

Kojo

Grab your grapefruit for this one—but all you will need is the peel. If you don't have a grapefruit for cutting the garnish—shame on you, you will have to use lemon—but you should know that the grapefruit peel in this cocktail does add an aromatic nuance that is definitely worth the effort. We are referring to the Kojo, a contemporary drink that we recently enjoyed at Hamlet, a fun little restaurant in the Pearl District of Portland, Oregon. It's a sherry cocktail selected to pair with the Spanish jamón they serve, but the drink itself was created by Washington DC's Derek Brown. We recently featured Brown's Getaway cocktail, so it was a happy coincidence to find another one of his creations at a local hot spot.

The recipe splits the base evenly between Oloroso sherry and gin, then balances lemon juice with falernum and a bit of

Click here and take a bigger gulp of this article. . .

Portland Bar Review: Kask

It's easy to think of Kask as a drinker's waiting room for Grüner or even the Multnomah Whiskey Library, but if you make that mistake you are likely to skip the other places completely and just hang out here for the evening. With a fantastic selection of signature cocktails and house-made mixers, there's something for everyone. The menu includes a daily punch special (possibly be the best cocktail value downtown) alongside a half-dozen seasonal recipes that punctuate a very complete cocktail list of recurring classics and originals. Everything is nicely laid out by spirit category. We love how each category is further divided into "Shaken" and "Stirred" sections giving clues to the type of drinks you might expect (shaken cocktails often contain citrus or other cloudy ingredients, while stirred drinks are always spirit driven). The cozy space also serves small bites

Click here and take a bigger gulp of this article. . .

Bourbon Bijou

Park Kitchen in Portland, Oregon makes a lovely drink they call the Bourbon Bijou. You may recall the Bijou cocktail we posted several years ago which is the inspiration for this whiskey-based variation. The original is a gin drink with over a century of history, whereas this one is a modern riff. We like them both because they are tasty and easy to make. That translates to "no fresh anything required" which means you can throw one together for yourself or a guest while you consider more involved alternatives. It's also a spirit-driven recipe for bolder palates (which is perfect for us) and another excuse to use Chartreuse.

Bourbon Bijou at Park Kitchen, Portland, OR 1 oz bourbon 1 oz green Chartreuse 1 oz Cocchi Di Torino Italian vermouth 1 dash 50/50 orange bitters

Add all to a mixing glass and stir with ice until cold. Strain into

Click here and take a bigger gulp of this article. . .

First Word

Several years ago we wrote about the Last Word cocktail. If you haven't had the pleasure, you really should give it a try, especially if you are already a fan of the Aviation. Besides having a name befitting any New Year's Eve celebration, the Last Word contains some of our favorite ingredients—Luxardo Maraschino liqueur and green Chartreuse. As we transition from the end of one calendar year to the beginning of another, we decided to post a similar cocktail that we recently tried at one of our favorite restaurants in Portland, Oregon.

The First Word cocktail was featured on the fall menu at Toro Bravo. A little research will reveal that it's not an original name. There are several First Word recipes out there and none of them resembles this one.

Click here and take a bigger gulp of this article. . .