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A few weeks ago we posted a cocktail called the Briar Patch that is flavored and sweetened with jam. Of course, we turned to our favorite local shop, Republic of Jam for the featured ingredient. It turns out that they host a quarterly Cocktail Club event to share drink recipes that highlight their products, and this weekend we are invited as guest cocktail creator!

If you have been to the shop in Carlton, Oregon or visited the online store you know that they carry unique culinary syrups in addition to jam. It's easy to get overwhelmed with choices when every shelf has something you want to try. The Cocktail Club events help narrow the search by providing some inspiration in the form of samples. This quarter the theme is fables and fairy tales, and one of the recipes we submitted for the event on Saturday is

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Briar Patch

There are so many creative ways to sweeten a cocktail beyond using simple syrup. We have posted recipes over the years that make use of agave nectar, honey, liqueurs, and even jam. We love the idea of using fruit preserves as a way to add flavor, color and sugar. Jamie Boudreau's Breakfast Collins is a great example, and today we'd like to share another. This is called the Briar Patch cocktail and it was created by Portland's Jeffrey Morgenthaler of Clyde Common. It appears in the book, The American Cocktail which features 50 recipes from craft bartenders across the country.

The basic concept is similar to Boudreau's recipe, taking a sour formula and using jam as a sweetener. Where Jamie's Breakfast Collins subs rum for the base spirit in a classic Tom Collins, the Briar Patch sticks with

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Drink of the Week: Breakfast Collins

I have always been a fan of incorporating fresh seasonal ingredients into cocktails whenever possible. Living in Minnesota, there's nothing I can do about finding locally grown citrus, but I can use basil, mint, berries and plenty of other local produce—and not just for the garnish. Ideas can come from the farmers market or straight from my own garden. However, an often overlooked ingredient that offers a convenient alternative any time of the year is jelly or jam. Fruit preserves represent an opportunity to inject flavor and variety that you might not always consider. A perfect example of this appeared not long ago on the Small Screen Network with Jamie Boudreau using jam for a simple twist on a classic he called the Breakfast Collins.

The idea behind this is simple: you swap out the sweetener in a cocktail (in this case, we replace simple syrup in a

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