Tag: bitters

Brandy Crusta

The original definition of cocktail first published in 1806 was a simple combination of spirits, sugar, water and bitters. Drinks like the Old Fashioned and the Sazerac are good examples

Improved Gin Cockail

David Wondrich calls it “New York’s answer to the Sazerac.” If you’re a fan of that drink, you probably know that it comes from New Orleans. A true cocktail in

What’s in a name?

You could slap a name on any unique combination of ingredients and call it an original cocktail, but if you create something from scratch that you want people to remember,

Cinquecento

We like vodka at Summit Sips. We really do. But over the years it hasn’t shared as much of the lime light on these pages as other spirits. There are

Riviera, two ways

Sometimes,we feature classics, sometimes a riff, and once in a while it’s an exotic Tiki. There’s not really a pattern to the Drinks Of The Week here at Summit Sips,

Campari Sour

If any drink exemplifies the flavors that Campari has to offer, it’s probably straight Campari, but besides that, our Drink Of The Week really shows off this wonderful bitter liqueur.

Be A Better Bitter Imbiber

It’s probably long overdue, but we finally decided to write a few words about the bitter side of the cocktail spectrum—this time to outline some specific ingredients that impose this

Holiday Gifts for the Mixologist

Last year, we put together a comprehensive list of important gift items for the Mixologist. It’s still a good list, but this year, we decided to take a slightly different

Norwegian Wood

The first good sign of a decent cocktail bar is that they are using fresh ingredients. We’re not talking about lemon twists or lime wedges—we mean that they squeeze their

Saratoga

It’s getting cooler now with October behind us, and once we set our clocks back, darkness will descend before the cocktail hour. For many, that’s a sign that winter is

STEP to the Dot to the HEN

Imagine our delight to find out that our brother-in-law enjoys the exact same vodka martini that we do: Ketel One with a twist. It’s so simple that when we thought